COVID-19: What Residential Living Residents Can Do

March 26, 2020

Our number one priority is keeping our residents safe and healthy. You can help!

Residents can follow the recommendations for persons at higher risk of COVID-19 to protect themselves and others (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/specific-groups/high-risk-complications.html):

Clean your hands often
Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing, or having been in a public place/common area.

If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

To the extent possible, avoid touching high-touch surfaces in public places – elevator buttons, door handles, handrails, handshaking with people, etc. Use a tissue or your sleeve to cover your hand or finger if you must touch something.

Wash your hands after touching surfaces in public places.

Avoid touching your face, nose, and eyes.

Additionally, they can avoid close contact:

Stay in your homes or outdoors away from groups of people, as much as possible.
Limit visitors to persons essential to maintaining their health, well-being, and safety. Social interaction is important; however, in-person social interactions are associated with increased risk of infection.

Learn and practice alternative ways to interact, including replacing in-person group interactions with video or telephone calls.

Learn more about managing stress and anxiety during COVID-19.  https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/managing-stress-anxiety.html

Establish a “buddy” system to ensure they stay connected.

Residents can seek out a “buddy” who will regularly check on them (using preferably non-face-to-face communication).

Ensure continuity of the regular care and medical services they receive.

Residents can work with their primary caretakers to identify alternative caretakers to ensure continuity of care should there be any interruptions to the regular services they receive. Telemedicine services may be available to them. They can work with their medical providers to determine if any elective procedures or non-emergent services can be delayed without negatively impacting their health. They can ask their medical providers if they have a formal “telehealth” system for their regular appointments and, if not, ask if they can still communicate by telephone (instead of visits) to reduce the number of face-to-face interactions.

Have medication and supplies on hand.

Residents may want to consult with their healthcare providers and, if possible, plan to keep an extra supply of their regular prescriptions. Mail-order medications also could be considered as an alternative for those unable to get longer supplies of medication. They can ensure that they have an adequate supply of food and everyday essentials in their homes should a disruption occur for an extended period.

Keep their homes clean and disinfected.

It is important that residents keep their homes clean and disinfected by following these instructions  (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/cleaning-disinfection.html#routine-cleaning). If they become ill or if they are caring for someone who is ill, they can follow the guidance found here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/index.html

Download PDF